REVIEW

The Fragrance Awards: Santa Maria Novella’s Tuberosa

Remember our Skincare Awards back in early September? Well, we’re back! This time we turn our attention to all the fragrances, old and new, that have claimed a spot on our wrists and décolletages. From classic to citrus and everything in between, these are the fragrances we keep re-purchasing, find ourselves gushing to our besties about, and stare lovingly at on our bathroom shelves for inappropriate amounts of time.

Santa Maria Novella’s Tuberosa has got to be the prettiest fragrance on the market. Aesthetics aside, it does a stellar job of making the wearer smell delightful, bright, and fresh—and all day long, too. There’s also a neat bit of history attached to the Santa Maria Novella Acqua di Colonia line: the first of its perfumes was created in 1533 by Dominican friars for the Queen Caterina de’ Medici on her wedding day when she was just 14-years-old. She was marrying King Henry II of France, who was embroiled in an affair with Diane de Poitiers. Now you can wear a little bit of Renaissance history on your wrists. Cool, no?

A subtly floral scent, the tuberose fragrance smells of being outdoors in an overgrown garden. Tuberosa is a little piece of fresh, woody, slightly buttery history that will jazz up your shelf and make you feel like an absolute kween when you wear it. It has flecks of sandalwood, black pepper, and ylang-ylang, and becomes warmer and spicier as the day goes on. Eau de cologne at its best, Tuberosa and the 600-year-old brand that created it are legends of the highest order.

The perfume is a true mood enhancer. It’s a time capsule. It’s a fresh, fragrant breeze on a hot summer afternoon. It’s one of our go-to scents. Below, our very important and serious review:

If Tuberosa was a mood: Bliss
A language: Italian
A place: Bergamo, Northern Italy
An era: The ’70s
A person: Penélope Cruz
A song: Nicolas Jaar – Mi Mujer
A time: 6pm
A character: Jane March in L’Amant
A YouTube video: This

Words, Madeleine Woon. Photography, Ellen Virgona.