Christmas

The 12 Days Of Christmas: Byredo Fleur Fantome Room Spray

Before I get into this, I must confess: I love Byredo fragrances. My obsession started many years ago, not far from where I’m sitting right now. I caught one whiff of Gypsy Water eau de parfum in a Mecca store and I was hooked. Since then I’ve fallen prey to several scents, most notably La Tulipe and Inflorescence.

I’ve accumulated a small trove of Byredo products over the years including clutch-sized roll-on oils, exquisite candles and Kabuki sticks, my absolute fave. But until now I hadn’t tried their room sprays or parfums d’intérieur.

Each room spray is “created to fragrance the room and home with evocative scents” and the Fleur Fantôme spray does just that. Meaning ghost flower, Fleur Fantôme is born of the first flowers of a Swedish spring, which seem to Byredo founder Ben Gorham like apparitions. Though odourless, Fleur Fantôme is top heavy in lemon and rhubarb, with a heart of violet and tulip and some words I’ve never heard before at its base.

This is a beautiful scent that is both delicate and punchy. One night I sprayed it in my bedroom before a shower and returned to a garden after the rain. I drifted into sleep thinking about flowers and I’ve since used it all over the house. I’ve also taken to wearing it as a perfume, applying more conservatively than an eau de parfum.

If you’re going to buy me a Christmas present – or a Chanukah present really – buy me Byredo. If you’re going to buy yourself a Christmas present, buy yourself Byredo. And if you’re going to buy someone else a Christmas present, you get the gist. They smell amazing and look effortlessly chic, like Phoebe Philo or me that one time I smelled amazing and looked effortlessly chic.

A room spray is a particularly good gift as people are less precious about perfuming their homes than they are about perfuming their bodies. Choosing a perfume is a deeply personal ritual and I’m hesitant to pick a scent for even my best friend. But a room spray offers sensory joy without cramping someone’s scent style plus they might use it as a perfume anyway.

Words, Nadine von Cohen. Video, Duc Thinh Dong.